December 26, 2005

Ted Nolan wants back in the NHL: Nolan would like an NHL job, the New Jersey Devils would like a head coach. Lou Lamoriello (team president and GM) has been the Dev's coach since Larry Robinson left the team on Dec. 19.

posted by HATER 187 to hockey at 08:46 AM - 18 comments

Nolan won the Jack Adams on a not so talented Sabers team. Imagine if you will Nolan on a deep team like the Dev's that have underachived so far this season, but are desperately looking to turn it around. This could be the shot in the arm the team I love to hate needs.

posted by HATER 187 at 08:49 AM on December 26

The Devils are New Jersey's greatest team.but I like the Flyers.Lamoriello is the best gm in sports. I wish he was running the Flyers or even the Eagles.I love how he knows when to push a coach out the door, no matter if they are in first place or have a winning record.The Nolan situation is a curious one. I had always heard his exit from Buffalo was race related. He was a bit too "uppity" for upstate New York. Does anyone know the real deal?

posted by at 09:57 AM on December 26

I saw this last night, and thought about posting it here. Any way we could maybe help promote this? Start a campaign? This would not only be a great fit, it would make the Devils better instantly (no knock on Larry Robinson, but once Nolan gets his sea legs back, he'll be better), and more importantly, it would be a masterstroke of goodwill. He's been coaching in the Quebec Major Junior League, so he's used to the wide-open north-south hockey thing already. He's shown he's still got it. And, as was established once again last week, he's shown himself to be an alarmingly classy guy too. Seriously, if the Devils hire him, I would consider reducing my Devil-hatred level. I said I'd consider it.

posted by chicobangs at 10:11 AM on December 26

Living near Buffalo, I, too, have always been curious as to the real reason Nolan never stuck in the NHL. Many believe his coaching abilities in Buffalo were overshadowed by Dominick Hasek's domination of the goalie position at that time, feeling it was him, not Nolan, that should be credited with the Sabres' success. Having followed the Sabres back then, it was a pretty-much understood Hasek either held the opponent to two or less goals or the Sabres would have no chance in winning (He WAS amazing back then (and is still very good)). There's also the never-dying rumor that John Muckler, who was running the Sabres back then, had Nolan blackballed from the NHL (something I don't really believe). As for Nolan being too "uppity" for upsate New York, I'm not sure if that's the proper label for it, but Nolan definitely had attitude that rubbed many people the wrong way. It became a battle of personalities between Nolan, Muckler and Hasek, and Nolan was the one run out of town. I, for one, would like to see him back behind the bench in the NHL to finally see if he can really coach and lead another team to success.

posted by dyams at 10:15 AM on December 26

I have never been a huge fan of Hasek.Though his numbers are mind blowing.He could be spectacular,Hasek's save aginst Eric Lindros on a penalty shot in the World Championships was the greatest save I have ever seen, I never felt he was as clutch as Roy,Broduer,Smith,Parent or Dryden.I think that like many europeans he did not think much of the Stanley Cup and just wanted the crazy(league crushing,lockout looming) NHL money.The Sabres had an all-star caliber lineup around him(brett hull in the crease aside), but it took a Hall of Fame line up in Detroit to bring Hasek the Cup. I think the Muckler theory deserves some discussion, his decisions have been a bit inconsistant toward the latter half of his career.Hockey is a very emotional sport even off the ice,players hold gudges for years(Clark/Lindros,Roy/lamaire,Keenan/everyone)

posted by at 12:08 PM on December 26

On the Devils broadcast tonight (Leafs 2, NJ 1; it's baby steps, people), they mentioned the Nolan thing and dismissed it out of hand. According to the genii on the telecast, the fact that Nolan went public with his desire to coach the Devils immediately disqualifies him from the job, because Lamoriello doesn't negotiate in public. I don't buy that. Frankly, it wouldn't surprise me if Ted Nolan tried calling the Devils front office and got someone's voicemail. If it's not New Jersey, he'll wind up somewhere. And I for one will be thrilled.

posted by chicobangs at 10:43 PM on December 26

he'll get his chance if not with n.j. this year with somebopdy else.not this year?then next year or the year after that.big league coaches lead a charmed life.almost always when they get fired sooner or later they get a new job.

posted by meijer067 at 11:52 PM on December 26

Clarification of what happened, for Nolan's sake, and so Lou doesn't exclude him from consideration because of the publicity.

posted by garfield at 11:34 AM on December 27

Good. You hear that, Lou? Now, we'll leave you two to talk. Call us if you need anything.

posted by chicobangs at 01:38 PM on December 27

Setting the record straight : "For starters, everything you think you know about Nolan -- particularly all those vicious rumors that dogged him immediately after his time in Buffalo -- are not true."

posted by garfield at 05:03 PM on December 27

What a great article, garfield.

posted by chicobangs at 07:03 PM on December 27

Yeah, thanks for finding that.

posted by dyams at 09:10 PM on December 27

So, He doesn't coach in the NHL because he prefers the minors? Coaching in the NHL was too hard? I did not understand why he left the NHL based upon what I read in the article. Was it a Canada/USA thing. Does he have rich parents?

posted by at 09:27 PM on December 27

glad I could link for y'all Power struggle, in a....two words...since I'm inebriated. ...fuck it....he isn't in the NHL because Muckler fucked him, and the Sabres ownership vacuum (remember the Rigas fiasco) sucked him into it.

posted by garfield at 09:59 PM on December 27

Hasek was a BIG part of the determination he left Buffalo. Hasek and Scotty Bowman didn't get along either, but Bowman allowed him to have his way until he got his last Cup to beat the record. Notice he left Detroit, too? Hasek is giving the same hassles in his new city, too. But if he's doing the job, they let him alone. Nolan may not go to New Jersey. They are probably too tight on acceptance for what they think. But he will get the job somewhere, and soon. He's got way too much class for the Junior leagues, otherwise he'd not be showing any interest.

posted by mrhockey at 10:25 PM on December 27

mr, did you see the part about Hasek being duped in Buffalo? I hadn't heard that before.

posted by garfield at 10:41 PM on December 27

Saw it, never paid it much attention however. I met Hasek in Detroit after the 2002 New Year's Eve game, and interviewed him for my regional newspaper, with not such good results. Dominik Hasek suspects everyone of giving him false information. He thought Scotty Bowman was lying to him about numerous things, but he knew he stood his best chance of the Cup in Detroit. And anyone who thinks that the European players do not revere Lord Stanley's grand prize are deluding themselves. He was convinced at the time he was in Motown that Nolan had been dishonest with him, and from every single impression I've ever gotten of Ted he doesn't lie to his players, unless HE has been fed misinformation (which he was in Buffalo). But how the hell could he have known that at that time?

posted by mrhockey at 06:16 AM on December 28

he isn't in the NHL because Muckler fucked him, and the Sabres ownership vacuum (remember the Rigas fiasco) sucked him into it. Yeah, that is what I thought. I think the NHL is the best league for holding grudges.Some guys can't trade their integrity for a cash redeemer He was convinced at the time he was in Motown that Nolan had been dishonest with him, and from every single impression I've ever gotten of Ted he doesn't lie to his players, unless HE has been fed misinformation So, Hasek was paranoid? How were they dishonest with him?

posted by at 06:57 AM on December 28

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