February 12, 2004

The Jock Tax is it fair?: Cincinnati has imposed a tax on athletes (and entertainers) playing fewer than 12 days a year in their fair city. The final total for 2003 was more than $900,000. How many other cities are doing this out there, and is it fair to nail a guy for doing his job when the city already benefits greatly from the competition being held?

posted by wfrazerjr to culture at 11:22 AM - 4 comments

If this is a tax that was crafted solely to get at athletes and entertainers and Cincinnati doesn't otherwise have a city tax, then it is unfair. Otherwise, I would say it it fair. Technically, you owe tax for money whereever you earned it. Many states go after doctors, surgeons who have high salaries and there time in the state can be easily documented. Athletes and entertainers are the easiest to document of all because of their scheduled public performances.

posted by dales15 at 12:59 PM on February 12, 2004

I think a few NHL cities already do this. And hey, if pro athletes and rock stars have to pay a tax to pillage my wallet, fine by me.

posted by garfield at 01:31 PM on February 12, 2004

I think Alberta has done or is doing it (or has pushed for it) and Montreal is currently pushing for it. Is it fair? Depends. My problem is with the exclusive nature of the tax -- ie. it's pretty much solely targetted at sports athletes. Do you tax a band on tour too? Do you tax the CEO on a business trip? If you do, I guess it's somewhat fair (though I don't like it, but I don't like income tax either); if not, and it's only on athletes, then it's definitely not fair. The one problem with this is: what if every state/province does this? A team with a long road-trip is going to be taxed up the bunghole (not to mention the travel costs).

posted by mkn at 08:00 PM on February 12, 2004

The article says something about athletes AND entertainers, so it's anyone who works less than 12 days a year in the city. You know they aren't out hustling down businesspeople or traveling salesmen, though. For the athletes and entertainers, I think this is double jeopardy. You know Cincinnati is pulling big tax jake on ticket sales, concessions, all that stuff. Well, you can't do that without an opponent in town, can you? You're bending the competition over a barrel for providing ... well, the competition! And I guarandamntee you Cincy has a hotel tax and all that crap. If I was other major-league cities? I'd prepare a special tax just for when the Reds or the Bengals came to town, then repeal it the next day. The one problem with this is: what if every state/province does this? A team with a long road-trip is going to be taxed up the bunghole (not to mention the travel costs). The Yankees got stuck for nearly $70 large, the article says. I assume everyone will start doing this now and trying to screw one another. You know what I hope? I hope the mayor of Cincinatti goes to the next gathering of the United States Conference of Mayors in Boston, where the honorable Thomas M. Menino will hand him a bill for the wages he earned from the city of Cincinatti while he was hanging around Beantown pounding down free chowdah. Up yours, Cincy.

posted by wfrazerjr at 09:18 PM on February 12, 2004

You're not logged in. Please log in or register.